Tel Aviv Museums and Attractions

Attractions and Museums

The Eretz Israel Museum focuses on the history and culture of the land of Israel with exhibitions on archaeology, ethnography, folklore, Judaica, cultural history, crafts and art. Learn about the history of pottery and ceramics in the region, see a reconstructed oil press and take in the on-site archaeological hill, Tell Qasile (a brief history can be found below). Pottery shards from the first temple period with Hebrew inscriptions and the remains of an ancient port city built by the Philistines in the 12th century BC were found there. Additionally, take in some of the temporary exhibits that can be seen here.
Hours: Sunday-Wednesday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Thursday: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Address: 2 Haim Levanon St., Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv 69975
Phone: 03.641.5244

Independence Hall is the historic building Israel was declared a state in May 1948. The building was a private residence in the early 1900s but at the behest of its owner was donated to the young city of Tel Aviv and transformed into a museum. The building was expanded and renovated and in 1936 became the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. The renovated Independence Hall opened to the public in 1978. Today the hall contains original documents of the creation of Israel, the names of those who attended the 1948 ceremony, invitations, recording and broadcasting equipment, memos and more. Visitors can listen to the original recording of the ceremony and view a 16-minute film describing the events of the period and the history of the building.
Hours: Sunday to Thursy from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday 9 a.m to 2 p.m.
Address: 16 Rothschild Blvd.
Email: atzmaut@netvision.net.il

The Bible Museum is not easy to find on the third floor of the Municipality Building on Rothschild Boulevard. But a treasure awaits those who seek. With two sections, “The Bible in Art” and “The Bible in Print,” visitors are privy to paintings, sculptures, and ceramics that feature the Bible, commentaries on the Bible and Apocrypha, history books, geography and archaeology books, as well as books on biblical criticism, and more. There is a model of the Temple, plants and flowers of the Bible, examples of temple priests’ garb and archaeological artifacts. Lectures and Bible studies by local and foreign experts are given.
Hours: Sunday through Friday:  9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Wednesday: 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 4 to 7 p.m.
Address: Dizengoff House, 16 Rotchild Blvd.
Phone: 03.517.7760

Beit Hatfutsot (Diaspora Museum) specializes in the history of the Jewish People from the exile of the tribes to the forming of the State of Israel. Visit the exhibitions, join a seminar or even ask for your family genealogy to be researched.
Hours: Sunday to Thursday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Wednesday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Friday 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Address: Klausner Street. Tel Aviv University Campus
Phone: 03.640.8000
http://www.bh.org.il/information/index.aspx

The Palmach Museum is a unique museum concept: a museum that is all experiential with no displays. Visitors join a group of young army recruits in the elite Palmach unit founded before the establishment of Israel and since disbanded, through the story of the Palmach beginning with the unit’s formation until the end of the War of Independence.  The actors take visitors on a journey punctuated by films, three-dimensional decor and documentary. Visits to the museum must be pre-arranged.