Mount Zion

Highlights

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The Crusader building housing both David’s Tomb and the Upper Room is a beautiful piece of architecture in its own right. The stained glass windows from Ottoman times are exceptionalin addition to the columns and stone work. The building has gone through numerous changes through the centuries and the many periods are recognizablein to the trained eye.

 

 

Background Information

 

The Tomb of David has been revered as a holy place by the three monotheistic religions for centuries. Remnants of a Byzantine church can be found at the place and it has also been used as a mosque. All three traditions are based on an age old reverence for the place dating back to the 3rd Century. Since the establishment of Israel in 1948 Mount Zion and thereby David’s Tomb fell into Israeli hands and has been a Jewish holy site since. The tradition for the site being David’s Tomb is relatively recent and dates back to the 11th Century only. On the second floor of the tomb one will find the Room of the Last Supper which is a Christian holy place also called the Mount Zion Church. The church commemorates the Last Supper of Jesus which can’t have taken place in the building which was built in the 12th Century, but which might have taken place in the area.

 

Travelujah Tips

 

David’s Tomb is closed on Saturdays, the Jewish Sabbath. Free of charge. Men are expected to cover their heads upon entry. The building also houses a Yeshiva (Jewish Bible school). The Upper Room is on the second floor of the building and visitors are requested to respect the other religion.