About Us Holy Land Sites Holy Land Tours Christian Photos Community Travel Tips

Tags - uc davis

January 13, 2010January 13, 2010  0 comments  wine

 

    Behind every good winery there's typically a good story.  Since the Flam Winery is considered one of Israel's best wineries, it's only natural it has one of the most compelling stories. The winery was started humbly in 1998 by brothers Golan & Gilad Flam. In their first vintage they only made a couple of barrels of wine, one of Cabernet Sauvignon and one of Merlot.  Now that's how many family wineries start and many if not most never get too much bigger although this wasn't any average family of vintners.

 

dsr and Golan Flam

David Rhodes becomes a fan of winemaker Golan Flam and his wines

 

    After graduating with a degree in agricultural studies at Hebrew University Rehovet, Golan Flam furthered his studies as a winemaker while becoming a Master of Wine in Piacenza, Italy and then while serving a full year's intership at the Carpineto Winery in Italy's romantic Tuscany witnessing and participating in a grapes evolution from the vine to wine.  He extended his studies abroad taking a year to spend a full season in Australia at the Hardys Maclaren Winery.  Now that's not too unusual. Many of Israel's best winemakers have spent a year or two overseas gathering expertise before coming back to apply their knowledge and experience to an Israeli vineyard and/or winery.  Assaf Margalit, Gil Shatsberg, Ido Lewinsohn and Roni Salove, to name just a few, all interned overseas well before they gained recognition as great winemakers here in Israel. And the fact that his brother Gilad started the winery with him applying his acumen and education in business and law to managing the Flam Winery's business affairs isn't that extraordinary as well. What makes the Flam Winery's story unique is the cache the Flam name had when they first opened their winery and why it still does today.

 

Flam Winery

entering the Flam Winery in the Judean Hills

 

The reason the winery's name had a lot of gravitas when they started in 1998 was that at the time their father Israel Flam was the chief winemaker for the Carmel Winery, Israel's largest winery.  He had worked at the Carmel Winery since 1971 and would continue to do so until 2005, seven years after his sons had substantiated their following his passion for making wine.  Israel Flam has been a pioneer in Israeli winemaking in many ways. After serving as a paratrooper in the Israeli Defense Forces in the 60's, Israel Flam became the first notable Israeli winemaker to pursue expertise overseas and would become the first of many to study at California's UC Davis, one of the world's most pretigious university programs focused exclusively with viticulture and winemaking. 

 

dsr israel flam

Wine Pioneer Israel Flam... could I ask for a better tour guide?

 

    Israel served as chief winemaker at Carmel when it was undergoing many of its market shaking changes from being a big bloated giant producing tens of millions of bottles of cooked/ mevushal winery to a winery half it's former size sacrificing quanity to insure better quality.  Israel Flam had also been the winemaker when Carmel first launched it's Yatir sattleilte. As well, Israel Flam was at the helm when Carmel's Limited Edition, Single Vineyard and Appellation series of wines started showing a finer side to Carmel. As Carmel attemted to shed the baggage of decades of flooding the market with ton after ton of "liquid religion" and bland bulk wine, Israel capped a 35 vintage career at Carmel with inertia in what almost everyone agrees is an appreciated direction.  Considering he was a major player spearheading a reformation towards quality at Israel's largest winemaker (which now produces about 30% of Israel's wine... about 15 million bottles of Israel's 50 million bottles), the Israeli wine drinker and the industry as a whole owe Israel Flam more than most people a measure of gratitude for the amount of quality wine now being produced with "Made in Israel" on the label.

 

   The fact that Israel Flam fathered a pair of sons who would go on to establish one of Israel's most beloved boutique wineries is a testament to him (and his wife) as well. Though Golan and Gilad have surely made the Flam Winery their own triumph in winemaking and marketing success, having their father available as a consultant must have surely provided levels of confidence and experitese that most starting wineries could only envy. 

    By most measures, the Flam Winery makes some of Israel's best wines.  Golan supervises each wine from it's early days as grapes in the ninety plots they contract (in the Upper Galilee and the Judean Hills) to a wine's fermentation, aging and bottling.  Most of their vineyard plots have long term contracts with growers insuring they have access for up to 25 years. The growers are paid by managing the production designated per dunam (about a quarter of an acre) rather than by the tonnage of grapes each plot produces. This practice is fairly standard with wineries seeking quality over quanity and it can at least triple to quadruple the cost of the grapes they're pressing into wine by restricting the yield by at least 2/3 to 3/4 or more of a higher yield attempt.


   Even though their winery has steadily grown from it's initial 600 bottles to about 95,000 bottles/year, you'd be hard pressed to find anyone who'd say they've sacrificed quality along the way.  They've made measured steps each time they've sought to get expand production and by limiting their offering to a select few wines they've added a new offering here and there but haven't ever tried to bite off a bigger bite than they were seemingly able to chew. It's typically at about this level that most wineries have sought kosher certification if they hadn't already. The Flam Winery hasn't but Israel Flam insists that they're doing everything a kosher winery would be doing anyway and that his wines are "kosher but just not certified kosher."  Asked if they ever will seek certification, he responded "never say never," but there are no current plans.


    Their biggest selling wine is their entry level Classico series. This one wine series is about a 50/50 "Bordeaux blend" of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. It's got more New World punch than the typical Bordeaux but not as heavily oaked as a California or Australian 50/50 blend might be. It's become extremely popular as a wine by the glass in trendy Tel Aviv wine bars and restaurants and ages only 6 months in the barrel and then 6 months in the bottle before being released. This wine retails for 74NIS at the winery. The Classico accounts for about 60,000 of the 95,000 bottles/year they're currently delivering to the marketplace.

 

flam classisco 

2008 Flam Classico, 50/50 Cabernet Sauvignon/ Merlot

 

   Their second tier wine is their Flam Superiore wine. This wine is typically about 75 % Syrah and 25% Cabernet Sauvignon though it varies from year to year. The intention which might be soon realized is to make this wine an exclusiving Syrah wine. As their French clone vines have matured year after year, they've supported the flavor, backbone and complexity of the wine with older Cabernet Sauvignon stock. The feeling is sooner than later the Syrah will be ready to stand on its own though possibly it might find it's way into a blend with Mouvedre, another red Rhone grape they've been cultivating.  This wine matures for 12 months in the barrel before resting another 6 months in the bottle before release.

 

flam super

2007 Flam Superiore Syrah/ Cabernet Sauvignon

 

   The two top tier wines from Flam are their Merlot Reserve and Cabernet Sauvignon Reserve. These two wines have consistently been two of the best received wines in Israel year after year.   The 2006 Flam Merlot Reserve is 90% Merlot from Upper Galilee and 10% Petit Verdot from the Judean Hills.  The 2006 Flam Cabernet Sauvignon Reserve is 87% Cabernet Sauvignon 10% Merlot and 3% Petit Verdot.  This wine received 90 points from Robert Parker,  a high score for an Israeli wine from an internationally recognized wine critic.  In this series of wines, they're aged for 18 months in oak before an additional 6 months in the bottle.

 

2006 flam merlot

2006 Flam Merlot Reserve

 

   In any given year, red wines typically make up about  85 to 90%  of the Flam Winery's production. About 10% of their production is comprised of an immensly popular white wine that is a Sauvignon Blanc/Chardonnay blend. It's in such high demand that it typically sells out from the winery within two months of release.

  This year the winery is also realeasing a 2009 Rose. More and more Israeli wineries are releasing roses. It's a sensible market to explore as warmer regions tend to lend themselves to making better received red than white wines though the heat of summer might tempt one to a chilled glass white or rose rather than a big tannic glass of red wine.  Their initial rose will be a Cabernet Franc/Merlot blend. The Cabernet Franc juice was in contact with the skins for a lengthy six and half hours giving the wine a deep strawberry hue. The Merlot juice was added strictly for flavor and was not left for any time with the skins.

 

2009 flam rose

2009 Flam Rose Cabernet Franc/Merlot

Although the Flam name speaks loudly to the last 30 years of winemaking in Israel and all the changes that have happened along the way, their wines being crafted by Golan Flam speak to a rewarding future as more and more great Israeli wineries emerge with an ever increasing selection of interesting and delicious wines.


February 23, 2011February 23, 2011  1 comments  wine

       Today, I got to visit for my old friends (comparatively speaking in Israel) at Recanati. I thoroughly enjoy talking about wineries of their ilk because Recanati does a great job making great wines at different price points and their wines seem to get better year after year ( and they're only 20 minutes from where I live ttoo). This visit had some special significance because it was my first official tasting of their 2008 premium wines outside of tasting at events when there's too much additional stimulation to appreciate a wine without distraction and with the insight from the winemakers how they got to what your tasting in the glass. 

      The 2008 vintage wines have a special meaning at Recanati because the team of winemakers changed and this was their first vintage to see how the change reflected in the wines. The entry level reds of 2008 have been out a while but the higher end 2008's (Reserve now and the Special Reserve Red not too far down the road) which were aged longer are now on the shelves and there are noticable differences from previous incarnations.

      Gil Shatsberg and Ido Lewinsohn make up the current dynamic duo of winemakers at Recanati. Even though Gil holds the title of senior winemaker, it's very much a collaborative effort and that seems to make for better wines as each brings a different background to the winery. Gil had training at UC Davis, the most preeminent wine school in the USA and worked at Carmel, Israel's largest winery and was the sole winemaker at the Amphorae Winery before taking over from founding winemaker, fellow UC Davis grad Lewis Pasco. Ido has studied extensively in Italy, France and Australia and interned at Israel's prestigious boutique Margalit Winery and worked with Lewis before Gil took the helm. Between them they literally have a world's experience of winemaking.

    So, how are things different in their newest wines from Recanati's and most other Israeli wines?

    First, there's a difference in the white wines. Let's look at their two different Chardonnays the 2009 Recanati Chardonnay and 2009 Recanati Chardonnay Reserve. They differ less from each other than most Israeli or other "New World" (outside Europe) Chardonnays. They both avoid the malolactic ferementation process that has become so common with New World Chardonnays. Malolactic fermentation is a seconday fermention process (the primary turns sugar into alcohol and CO2). The process turns the prevelant astringent maliic acid in wine into a smoother silkier creamier lactic acid.  Lactic acid is the acid prevelant in dairy products. The drawback of this process is much of the fruitiness and varietal character is lost in this process. This also gives many Chardonnays the weight people associate with the grape alhtough oak aging also adds to this equation as well.  But, both Gil and Ido have developed an aversion to bombastic wines and strive to make more elegant wines. So one way to still give a body to the wine but bypassing the malolactic conversion is to age their Chardonnay sur lees or with the yeast after its died after fermentation. This is common enough in European whites but rarer in New World Whites. Preserving the acidity also preserves a crispness that is more true to the varietal and helps good Chardonnays age into great Chardonnays. A few other Chardonnays in Israel also have embraced this technique including the Tzuba and Tzora wineries.

 

Recanati 2009 Whites

2009 Recanati Special Reserve White

2009 Recanati Chardonnay

2009 Recanati Chardonnay Reserve

 

    Although Ido wouldn't say he thinks their 2009 Chardonnay is better than their 2009 Reserve Chardonnay he does admit it suits his personal taste of a less oaky Chardonnay where the Reserve should be popular with American drinkers who generally have a quencihng thirst for heavier oaked Chards.

   In the 2008 reds and beyond some noticeble changes have also arrived. One of the major changes happens in the vineyard where in the past the wineery may have harvested as late as possible to get the most ripe or even overripe grapes to insure maximum sugar and therefore  higher alcohol ...) Gil & Ido have been favoring harvesting as early as possible to get added acidity from the grapes and more nuanced, greener (i.e. more Old World) less sugar i.e., less alcoholic wines. Additionally, they're favoring using less "New Oak" (unused barrels) for older oak and shorter exposure times in many wines and seeking preservatives from the acidity rather than from more traditional oak tannins. Now, it's not a long stretch of rational thinking because acidity is what most notable white wines depend on for their longevity but to rely on it for a red wine is fairly innovative and counter conventional wisdom where the tannins from the skins or barrels are more often relied on.  Time will tell as this new generation of Recanati wines age but if Gil & Ido got it right (and I suspect they did) it could be a game changer in how most quality Israeli wines are made.

   Another change which may or not be noticable is that almost all of the Recanati Reserve wines except the Petite Sirah/Zinfandel are Single Vineyard wines). This may not make any of the wines better per se but it will make them more unique and an expression of terroir rather than market driven more homeginized wines.   Recanati does have some impressive plots in the Galilee and the Judean Hills so this Single Vineyard approach I think will help promote the appelations the wines derive from as well. 

    There's been a bug push in the last few years as more and more big and mid size Israeli wineries make their higher tier wines single vineyard wines. Many boutique do it easily because their small production warrants a single vineyard (or less and sell of the remaining grapes) or they have limited access to grapes as they buy on the open market and haven't the long term contracts that more established wineries secure to insure a long term supply.

 

Dave at Recanati 2/23/11

OK the white wine's were a great start...now on to the reds

Enjoying Recanati's 2007 Special Reserve Red

 

     If that wasn't enough of a change on the macro scale another major change is happening on the micro change as the wines are going through a dramatically different filtration system. Filtration is a big factor on how the finish product presents itself. Filtering through a filter with larger holes allows for more color and body to remain in the wine. Recanati uses extensive and more labor intensive racking the wines to help clarify the wines that a more exacting filtration would accomplish. It's a lot more work but to avoid a more precise yet body/color robbing filtering, Recanati and many other wineries insist on taking that extra measure. To illustrate the point the winery's current filtration is about 1/3 to 1/4 as exacting as previous measures but when compensated for in racking that's plus and not the cosmetic and textural minus it might be otherwise.

I'll revist the winery sooner than later to try their remaining wines like their Cabs, Merlots, Syrah and Sauvignon Blanc as well as their Yasmin entry level blends and their highly regarded Rose.

 

 

 

wines tasted today 2/23/11

 


2009 Recanati Chardonnay


2009 Recanati Chardonnay Reserve


2009 Recanati Special Reserve White


2008 Recanati Cabernet Franc


2008 Recanati Petite Sirah/Zinfandel


2007 Recanati Special Reserve Red

 


Search The Site.

Share This Page

Bookmark and Share

Description

DavidRhodes
Posts: 54
Comments: 59
David Rhodes worked at wineries in California & Israel, hosted over 100 wine parties.as a sommelier & adviser for the SDSU Business of Wine program. He speaks weekly about wine on Rustymikeradio.com & writes for ESRA magazine. Israeliwineguy@gmail.com

Categories

wine (48)

Tags

41 david rhodes (41)
19 wine (19)
19 merlot (19)
14 israel (14)
13 tishbi (13)
10 chardonnay (10)
10 carignan (10)
9 recanati (9)
6 grenache (6)
6 rose (6)
6 margalit (6)
5 shiraz (5)
5 oak (5)
5 bordeaux (5)
Search The Bible

Produced by KCS interactive boutique
Copyright © 2011 Travelujah.com